UK REGULATOR AUTHORIZES BP TO DUMP PIPES AND CABLES AT A MARINE PROTECTION AREA

Updated: Jul 25

The Guardian revealed that BP started dumping pipes and cables at a marine protection area after being provided with clearance by the UK’s Offshore Petroleum Regulator for the Environment and Decommissioning.

An investigation conducted by the Guardian revealed that BP (formerly The British Petroleum Company plc) sought approval from the UK regulator “Offshore Petroleum Regulator for the Environment and Decommissioning (Opred)” in order to dump 14 pipes and control cables at a marine protection area (MPA) 120 miles west of the Shetland Islands.


Marine protection areas are geographical spaces, which are internationally recognized and are dedicated and managed, through legal or other effective means, to achieve the long-term conservation of nature with associated ecosystem services and cultural values.

In its application to Opred, the company acknowledged the disposal would cause “localised, temporary disturbance of an area of seabed”. BP started dropping the pipes and cables four days ago after being provided with clearance by the UK’s decommissioning regulator.


The Guardian also revealed that a spokesperson for the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which includes Opred, confirmed BP was expected to recover the equipment and recycle it instead of letting it become waste to be dumped at sea.


Link to the Guardian investigation. #environment #pollution #energy #BP